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creatio-ex-materia:


by Claudio Silvestrin

creatio-ex-materia:

by Claudio Silvestrin

11” X 17” by Elisa Van Joolen | 2012

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'Approaching Shadow' by Chinese photographer, film director and actor Ho Fan / 何藩 | Hong Kong | 1954

'Approaching Shadow' by Chinese photographer, film director and actor Ho Fan / 何藩 | Hong Kong | 1954



My Graduation master thesis 'UNLESS YOU REMOVE: Objects that ask for an action' on show in the following events and venues:
- It has been exhibited at the show ‘Up Close, Wide Open’ in Eindhoven during Dutch Design Week 2012.
- It has been presented by Neutra Ediciones at ‘JustMad: Emerging Art Fair’ in Madrid from February 14th to 17th, 2013.
- It has been shown as part of the exhibition ‘Diseño a secas’ at the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Seville on June 8th-9th, 2013.


"Usually creating an object involves the addition of material. In this project by Luis Gómez Barquín, it’s the other way around. It is all about removing the excess to slowly tailor it to individual preference. In ‘Unless you Remove’, he has applied this method to a chair and a rug, but stresses that the idea can be applied to almost anything. In the beginning, his chair is not a chair yet. It simply has the potential to become a chair. It is a cube made up of layer upon layer of thin perforated wood. Only by removing parts of the layers, does it slowly ‘degenerate’ into a chair. In the same way, Barquín’s blanket starts off as a heavy, inflexible, thick mound of woven textiles. By picking away at the cloth it is transformed into a functional blanket. This process has been designed to take time. Lots of time. Barquín believes that relatively simple, repetitive tasks have a healing effect. ‘People nowadays think too much. Every time you physically remove something from the object, it’s like getting rid of some mental clutter’, he says”.

Credits: this quoted text by Annemarie Hoeve; art direction of these two pictures by Petra Janssen; these two photographs by Femke Rijerman. All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.
Visit also my main webpage www.lanne-lenne.com for more info and projects.

My Graduation master thesis 'UNLESS YOU REMOVE: Objects that ask for an action' on show in the following events and venues:

- It has been exhibited at the show ‘Up Close, Wide Open’ in Eindhoven during Dutch Design Week 2012.

- It has been presented by Neutra Ediciones at ‘JustMad: Emerging Art Fair’ in Madrid from February 14th to 17th, 2013.

- It has been shown as part of the exhibition ‘Diseño a secas’ at the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Seville on June 8th-9th, 2013.

image

"Usually creating an object involves the addition of material. In this project by Luis Gómez Barquín, it’s the other way around. It is all about removing the excess to slowly tailor it to individual preference. In ‘Unless you Remove’, he has applied this method to a chair and a rug, but stresses that the idea can be applied to almost anything. In the beginning, his chair is not a chair yet. It simply has the potential to become a chair. It is a cube made up of layer upon layer of thin perforated wood. Only by removing parts of the layers, does it slowly ‘degenerate’ into a chair. In the same way, Barquín’s blanket starts off as a heavy, inflexible, thick mound of woven textiles. By picking away at the cloth it is transformed into a functional blanket. This process has been designed to take time. Lots of time. Barquín believes that relatively simple, repetitive tasks have a healing effect. ‘People nowadays think too much. Every time you physically remove something from the object, it’s like getting rid of some mental clutter’, he says”.

Credits: this quoted text by Annemarie Hoeve; art direction of these two pictures by Petra Janssen; these two photographs by Femke Rijerman. All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

Visit also my main webpage www.lanne-lenne.com for more info and projects.

'Unless…' cutouts | 2012
Handmade cutouts to detail and represent some of the objects that form the family of pieces ‘Unless you remove' resulting from the project -a lamp, a chair, a blanket- by removing material from several sheets of superimposed semi-transparent papers…

'Unless…' cutouts | 2012

Handmade cutouts to detail and represent some of the objects that form the family of pieces ‘Unless you remove' resulting from the project -a lamp, a chair, a blanket- by removing material from several sheets of superimposed semi-transparent papers…

image

image

farewell-kingdom:

Photo series of China’s abandoned wonderland in Chenzhuang village, outside of Beijing.  A project started in 1998 that was supposed to be the largest theme park in Asia (via).

Maddie’s also finding her place…

Maddie’s also finding her place…

(Source: maddieonthings)

Papercuts by Peter Callesen | Denmark

Papercuts by Peter Callesen | Denmark

Abstract City | The collected visual essays of Christoph Niemann, blending quirky humor with truth about the human condition.

Abstract City | The collected visual essays of Christoph Niemann, blending quirky humor with truth about the human condition.

(Source: explore-blog, via porcupinerock)

Sculptures in a pencil lead by Dalton M. Ghetti | Brazil-USA

Sculptures in a pencil lead by Dalton M. Ghetti | Brazil-USA

Curvaceous | Limburg curved asparagus | My 3rd Term Finals | 2011

Nowadays we just see perfect vegetables on the market because the imperfect ones stay in the farm, although taste and quality are the same in both cases. The “de Poshoof” family farm just set up a Bed & Breakfast so they can give the delicious but “imperfect” curved asparagus to their guest inside a cozy and home-made package to have a snack during their visits around Maastricht; a package that the guests receive as a business present from the “de Poshoof” farm to be used afterward in their daily life as often as they want since it can be cleaned in the washing machine. By transferring the shape of the harvesting land into the package, the curved asparagus become more sculptural when they are faced to the straight lines and surfaces of the wrapping, a wrapping made out of two sewn layers -a polypropylene plastic foil as a dish and an organic cotton fabric as a napkin- to help people to re-discover again what nature really produces.














(+) My specialty is the curved asparagus from  “de Poshoof” farm in Maastricht. I found terrible the fact that the farmer cannot sell the curved asparagus because of market reasons. This family farm just set up a Bed and Breakfast and they have to provide a nice breakfast to their guests every morning. My product is a take-away package to have an asparagus-based breakfast and make the most of the day around Maastricht, by using origami shapes for the package, with straight lines and surfaces to empower the curved shape of the asparagus, and to transfer the shape of the harvesting terrain into the package as well. This take-away package works as a 2-sided eating kit: one side is made out of plastic to have a hygienic surface to eat; the other side is made out of fabric to have a napkin to clean your fingers. Both layers of the package are sewn together and can be easily cleaned in the washing machine to reuse it as often as you want. You, as a guest of the Bed and Breakfast, will receive this breakfast package as a present the first day and you will take it at home to use it whenever you like instead of throwaway aluminium foil. Since the package has the name of the farm, every time you use it, you will remember what a wonderful time you spent there and maybe plan a new visit.
*Making by folding A4-size paper templates:


Some of the booklet pages are posted now:











Mentored by Dick van Hoff

Curvaceous | Limburg curved asparagus | My 3rd Term Finals | 2011

Nowadays we just see perfect vegetables on the market because the imperfect ones stay in the farm, although taste and quality are the same in both cases. The “de Poshoof” family farm just set up a Bed & Breakfast so they can give the delicious but “imperfect” curved asparagus to their guest inside a cozy and home-made package to have a snack during their visits around Maastricht; a package that the guests receive as a business present from the “de Poshoof” farm to be used afterward in their daily life as often as they want since it can be cleaned in the washing machine. By transferring the shape of the harvesting land into the package, the curved asparagus become more sculptural when they are faced to the straight lines and surfaces of the wrapping, a wrapping made out of two sewn layers -a polypropylene plastic foil as a dish and an organic cotton fabric as a napkin- to help people to re-discover again what nature really produces.

(+) My specialty is the curved asparagus from  “de Poshoof” farm in Maastricht. I found terrible the fact that the farmer cannot sell the curved asparagus because of market reasons. This family farm just set up a Bed and Breakfast and they have to provide a nice breakfast to their guests every morning. My product is a take-away package to have an asparagus-based breakfast and make the most of the day around Maastricht, by using origami shapes for the package, with straight lines and surfaces to empower the curved shape of the asparagus, and to transfer the shape of the harvesting terrain into the package as well. This take-away package works as a 2-sided eating kit: one side is made out of plastic to have a hygienic surface to eat; the other side is made out of fabric to have a napkin to clean your fingers. Both layers of the package are sewn together and can be easily cleaned in the washing machine to reuse it as often as you want. You, as a guest of the Bed and Breakfast, will receive this breakfast package as a present the first day and you will take it at home to use it whenever you like instead of throwaway aluminium foil. Since the package has the name of the farm, every time you use it, you will remember what a wonderful time you spent there and maybe plan a new visit.

*Making by folding A4-size paper templates:

Some of the booklet pages are posted now:

Mentored by Dick van Hoff

Public LightShading | Shared infrastructure | My 3rd Term Finals | 2011

The history of Limburg will be told by shadows. Remembering the date of an important event of the neighbourhood in the past, the Sun -the most public light ever- will create a meaningful and recognizable shadow just at one specific moment of one day of the year. Inspired by the signage pollution in the streets, a new object will appear in the neighbourhood, an object made out of several “empty” sign elements around a real traffic sign where neighbours and new inhabitants can exchange information or find what they need, a physical board that will show and support the lively life of the neighbourhood. An object that, for instance, will reproduce the shadow of a no longer existing coalmine tower every year in the day when the mining industry stopped its activity in that enclave…

(+) The signage pollution in the streets is a problem that cities in are trying to remove. But for me, it’s possible to turn it to a new perspective without removing anything. Immediately, the sculptures of Alexander Calder came to my mind. What if I use this mess of signs to create or visualize something else? What if with these elements I can tell and show the history of the region? Of course, a lighting project is mainly aimed to think on the dark hours of the day, but these objects are also present during daylight. By combining two unique features of the Limburg region, I can create a meaningful action related with lighting: these two uniquenesses are the latitude of the place and the common regional heritage of Limburg. With the solar graphic of the latitude I can place and draw the shadow of an object on a specific day in a specific hour. So, I want to show the uniqueness of the Limburgish region by using the uniqueness of the latitude. Using these signage elements that don’t have any order, they become special, or better, their shadows become special just one day, in one specific hour, in one specific minute of the year, because only in that precise moment, the composition of these shadows creates a meaningful shape, and the shape itself is telling the story.

Some pages of my research booklet on the experiments and compositions with signage shadows are shown next:

Mentored by Thomas Lommee

LandLinescape | Invisible infrastructure of ideas | My 3rd Term Finals | 2011

Sunken lanes, hollow roads, military fortifications, highways, former defensive walls, harvesting lands… nature or man-made lines within the countryside of Maastricht where the landscape can be discovered on a sequence, sometimes you are higher, sometimes you are lower. A forgotten large-scale “linescape” with a strong sculptural character that makes you feel really embraced by nature, in direct contact with earth, inside a big piece of non-deliberate landart. A personal research on “linescape” given expression to a series of postcards -a mapping series, a lines series, a personal intervention series and a trip series- that will travel by mail around the world, looking for being promoted, discovered and experienced as a reference of a unique landscape of The Netherlands.
The five series of my “linescape” postcard collection are shown next:
*Man-made line series



*Nature-made line series



*Trips series






*Personal intervention series



*Mapping series





(+) Impressed by the sunken lanes around Maastricht, my project is not about “landscape” but “linescape”.  I find it very artistic and sculpture-related. I have gone several times to Maastricht and surroundings to check personally these sunken lanes in the landscape but also other “man-made” lines that I consider very related to each other, such as the military fort of Maastricht or the former defensive wall of the city. I was taking pictures every 30 steps while I was making these promenades to express the feelings you have when you follow these lines, and how you are discovering the landscape on a sequence, sometimes you are higher, sometimes you are lower. In each line, I found something interesting in one point (invisible landmarks) because a line is made out of points: a small chapel, a water fountain… So, how can I highlight the landscape of Limburg and put it into value? What if this area is in a way a big artwork of Michael Heizer for instance? And what if in the end I make a point intervention on one point of one of these lines that embodies and reflects even more this sculpture character and the rest of the features, such as the feeling of been embraced by nature, direct contact with earth, partially vision of the landscape, etc.?







Here, some pages of the research booklet:



















Mentored by Rianne Makkink

LandLinescape | Invisible infrastructure of ideas | My 3rd Term Finals | 2011

Sunken lanes, hollow roads, military fortifications, highways, former defensive walls, harvesting lands… nature or man-made lines within the countryside of Maastricht where the landscape can be discovered on a sequence, sometimes you are higher, sometimes you are lower. A forgotten large-scale “linescape” with a strong sculptural character that makes you feel really embraced by nature, in direct contact with earth, inside a big piece of non-deliberate landart. A personal research on “linescape” given expression to a series of postcards -a mapping series, a lines series, a personal intervention series and a trip series- that will travel by mail around the world, looking for being promoted, discovered and experienced as a reference of a unique landscape of The Netherlands.

The five series of my “linescape” postcard collection are shown next:

*Man-made line series

*Nature-made line series

*Trips series

*Personal intervention series

*Mapping series


(+) Impressed by the sunken lanes around Maastricht, my project is not about “landscape” but “linescape”.  I find it very artistic and sculpture-related. I have gone several times to Maastricht and surroundings to check personally these sunken lanes in the landscape but also other “man-made” lines that I consider very related to each other, such as the military fort of Maastricht or the former defensive wall of the city. I was taking pictures every 30 steps while I was making these promenades to express the feelings you have when you follow these lines, and how you are discovering the landscape on a sequence, sometimes you are higher, sometimes you are lower. In each line, I found something interesting in one point (invisible landmarks) because a line is made out of points: a small chapel, a water fountain… So, how can I highlight the landscape of Limburg and put it into value? What if this area is in a way a big artwork of Michael Heizer for instance? And what if in the end I make a point intervention on one point of one of these lines that embodies and reflects even more this sculpture character and the rest of the features, such as the feeling of been embraced by nature, direct contact with earth, partially vision of the landscape, etc.?

Here, some pages of the research booklet:

Mentored by Rianne Makkink

creatio-ex-materia:


by Claudio Silvestrin

creatio-ex-materia:

by Claudio Silvestrin

11” X 17” by Elisa Van Joolen | 2012

image

image

image

image

image

image

'Approaching Shadow' by Chinese photographer, film director and actor Ho Fan / 何藩 | Hong Kong | 1954

'Approaching Shadow' by Chinese photographer, film director and actor Ho Fan / 何藩 | Hong Kong | 1954



My Graduation master thesis 'UNLESS YOU REMOVE: Objects that ask for an action' on show in the following events and venues:
- It has been exhibited at the show ‘Up Close, Wide Open’ in Eindhoven during Dutch Design Week 2012.
- It has been presented by Neutra Ediciones at ‘JustMad: Emerging Art Fair’ in Madrid from February 14th to 17th, 2013.
- It has been shown as part of the exhibition ‘Diseño a secas’ at the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Seville on June 8th-9th, 2013.


"Usually creating an object involves the addition of material. In this project by Luis Gómez Barquín, it’s the other way around. It is all about removing the excess to slowly tailor it to individual preference. In ‘Unless you Remove’, he has applied this method to a chair and a rug, but stresses that the idea can be applied to almost anything. In the beginning, his chair is not a chair yet. It simply has the potential to become a chair. It is a cube made up of layer upon layer of thin perforated wood. Only by removing parts of the layers, does it slowly ‘degenerate’ into a chair. In the same way, Barquín’s blanket starts off as a heavy, inflexible, thick mound of woven textiles. By picking away at the cloth it is transformed into a functional blanket. This process has been designed to take time. Lots of time. Barquín believes that relatively simple, repetitive tasks have a healing effect. ‘People nowadays think too much. Every time you physically remove something from the object, it’s like getting rid of some mental clutter’, he says”.

Credits: this quoted text by Annemarie Hoeve; art direction of these two pictures by Petra Janssen; these two photographs by Femke Rijerman. All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.
Visit also my main webpage www.lanne-lenne.com for more info and projects.

My Graduation master thesis 'UNLESS YOU REMOVE: Objects that ask for an action' on show in the following events and venues:

- It has been exhibited at the show ‘Up Close, Wide Open’ in Eindhoven during Dutch Design Week 2012.

- It has been presented by Neutra Ediciones at ‘JustMad: Emerging Art Fair’ in Madrid from February 14th to 17th, 2013.

- It has been shown as part of the exhibition ‘Diseño a secas’ at the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Seville on June 8th-9th, 2013.

image

"Usually creating an object involves the addition of material. In this project by Luis Gómez Barquín, it’s the other way around. It is all about removing the excess to slowly tailor it to individual preference. In ‘Unless you Remove’, he has applied this method to a chair and a rug, but stresses that the idea can be applied to almost anything. In the beginning, his chair is not a chair yet. It simply has the potential to become a chair. It is a cube made up of layer upon layer of thin perforated wood. Only by removing parts of the layers, does it slowly ‘degenerate’ into a chair. In the same way, Barquín’s blanket starts off as a heavy, inflexible, thick mound of woven textiles. By picking away at the cloth it is transformed into a functional blanket. This process has been designed to take time. Lots of time. Barquín believes that relatively simple, repetitive tasks have a healing effect. ‘People nowadays think too much. Every time you physically remove something from the object, it’s like getting rid of some mental clutter’, he says”.

Credits: this quoted text by Annemarie Hoeve; art direction of these two pictures by Petra Janssen; these two photographs by Femke Rijerman. All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

Visit also my main webpage www.lanne-lenne.com for more info and projects.

'Unless…' cutouts | 2012
Handmade cutouts to detail and represent some of the objects that form the family of pieces ‘Unless you remove' resulting from the project -a lamp, a chair, a blanket- by removing material from several sheets of superimposed semi-transparent papers…

'Unless…' cutouts | 2012

Handmade cutouts to detail and represent some of the objects that form the family of pieces ‘Unless you remove' resulting from the project -a lamp, a chair, a blanket- by removing material from several sheets of superimposed semi-transparent papers…

image

image

designcollector:


Sculptures by Takahiro Iwasaki http://dcult.net/Ylhtk8

designcollector:

Sculptures by Takahiro Iwasaki http://dcult.net/Ylhtk8

(via quietgray)

farewell-kingdom:

Photo series of China’s abandoned wonderland in Chenzhuang village, outside of Beijing.  A project started in 1998 that was supposed to be the largest theme park in Asia (via).

Maddie’s also finding her place…

Maddie’s also finding her place…

(Source: maddieonthings)

Papercuts by Peter Callesen | Denmark

Papercuts by Peter Callesen | Denmark

Abstract City | The collected visual essays of Christoph Niemann, blending quirky humor with truth about the human condition.

Abstract City | The collected visual essays of Christoph Niemann, blending quirky humor with truth about the human condition.

(Source: explore-blog, via porcupinerock)

Sculptures in a pencil lead by Dalton M. Ghetti | Brazil-USA

Sculptures in a pencil lead by Dalton M. Ghetti | Brazil-USA

Curvaceous | Limburg curved asparagus | My 3rd Term Finals | 2011

Nowadays we just see perfect vegetables on the market because the imperfect ones stay in the farm, although taste and quality are the same in both cases. The “de Poshoof” family farm just set up a Bed & Breakfast so they can give the delicious but “imperfect” curved asparagus to their guest inside a cozy and home-made package to have a snack during their visits around Maastricht; a package that the guests receive as a business present from the “de Poshoof” farm to be used afterward in their daily life as often as they want since it can be cleaned in the washing machine. By transferring the shape of the harvesting land into the package, the curved asparagus become more sculptural when they are faced to the straight lines and surfaces of the wrapping, a wrapping made out of two sewn layers -a polypropylene plastic foil as a dish and an organic cotton fabric as a napkin- to help people to re-discover again what nature really produces.














(+) My specialty is the curved asparagus from  “de Poshoof” farm in Maastricht. I found terrible the fact that the farmer cannot sell the curved asparagus because of market reasons. This family farm just set up a Bed and Breakfast and they have to provide a nice breakfast to their guests every morning. My product is a take-away package to have an asparagus-based breakfast and make the most of the day around Maastricht, by using origami shapes for the package, with straight lines and surfaces to empower the curved shape of the asparagus, and to transfer the shape of the harvesting terrain into the package as well. This take-away package works as a 2-sided eating kit: one side is made out of plastic to have a hygienic surface to eat; the other side is made out of fabric to have a napkin to clean your fingers. Both layers of the package are sewn together and can be easily cleaned in the washing machine to reuse it as often as you want. You, as a guest of the Bed and Breakfast, will receive this breakfast package as a present the first day and you will take it at home to use it whenever you like instead of throwaway aluminium foil. Since the package has the name of the farm, every time you use it, you will remember what a wonderful time you spent there and maybe plan a new visit.
*Making by folding A4-size paper templates:


Some of the booklet pages are posted now:











Mentored by Dick van Hoff

Curvaceous | Limburg curved asparagus | My 3rd Term Finals | 2011

Nowadays we just see perfect vegetables on the market because the imperfect ones stay in the farm, although taste and quality are the same in both cases. The “de Poshoof” family farm just set up a Bed & Breakfast so they can give the delicious but “imperfect” curved asparagus to their guest inside a cozy and home-made package to have a snack during their visits around Maastricht; a package that the guests receive as a business present from the “de Poshoof” farm to be used afterward in their daily life as often as they want since it can be cleaned in the washing machine. By transferring the shape of the harvesting land into the package, the curved asparagus become more sculptural when they are faced to the straight lines and surfaces of the wrapping, a wrapping made out of two sewn layers -a polypropylene plastic foil as a dish and an organic cotton fabric as a napkin- to help people to re-discover again what nature really produces.

(+) My specialty is the curved asparagus from  “de Poshoof” farm in Maastricht. I found terrible the fact that the farmer cannot sell the curved asparagus because of market reasons. This family farm just set up a Bed and Breakfast and they have to provide a nice breakfast to their guests every morning. My product is a take-away package to have an asparagus-based breakfast and make the most of the day around Maastricht, by using origami shapes for the package, with straight lines and surfaces to empower the curved shape of the asparagus, and to transfer the shape of the harvesting terrain into the package as well. This take-away package works as a 2-sided eating kit: one side is made out of plastic to have a hygienic surface to eat; the other side is made out of fabric to have a napkin to clean your fingers. Both layers of the package are sewn together and can be easily cleaned in the washing machine to reuse it as often as you want. You, as a guest of the Bed and Breakfast, will receive this breakfast package as a present the first day and you will take it at home to use it whenever you like instead of throwaway aluminium foil. Since the package has the name of the farm, every time you use it, you will remember what a wonderful time you spent there and maybe plan a new visit.

*Making by folding A4-size paper templates:

Some of the booklet pages are posted now:

Mentored by Dick van Hoff

Public LightShading | Shared infrastructure | My 3rd Term Finals | 2011

The history of Limburg will be told by shadows. Remembering the date of an important event of the neighbourhood in the past, the Sun -the most public light ever- will create a meaningful and recognizable shadow just at one specific moment of one day of the year. Inspired by the signage pollution in the streets, a new object will appear in the neighbourhood, an object made out of several “empty” sign elements around a real traffic sign where neighbours and new inhabitants can exchange information or find what they need, a physical board that will show and support the lively life of the neighbourhood. An object that, for instance, will reproduce the shadow of a no longer existing coalmine tower every year in the day when the mining industry stopped its activity in that enclave…

(+) The signage pollution in the streets is a problem that cities in are trying to remove. But for me, it’s possible to turn it to a new perspective without removing anything. Immediately, the sculptures of Alexander Calder came to my mind. What if I use this mess of signs to create or visualize something else? What if with these elements I can tell and show the history of the region? Of course, a lighting project is mainly aimed to think on the dark hours of the day, but these objects are also present during daylight. By combining two unique features of the Limburg region, I can create a meaningful action related with lighting: these two uniquenesses are the latitude of the place and the common regional heritage of Limburg. With the solar graphic of the latitude I can place and draw the shadow of an object on a specific day in a specific hour. So, I want to show the uniqueness of the Limburgish region by using the uniqueness of the latitude. Using these signage elements that don’t have any order, they become special, or better, their shadows become special just one day, in one specific hour, in one specific minute of the year, because only in that precise moment, the composition of these shadows creates a meaningful shape, and the shape itself is telling the story.

Some pages of my research booklet on the experiments and compositions with signage shadows are shown next:

Mentored by Thomas Lommee

LandLinescape | Invisible infrastructure of ideas | My 3rd Term Finals | 2011

Sunken lanes, hollow roads, military fortifications, highways, former defensive walls, harvesting lands… nature or man-made lines within the countryside of Maastricht where the landscape can be discovered on a sequence, sometimes you are higher, sometimes you are lower. A forgotten large-scale “linescape” with a strong sculptural character that makes you feel really embraced by nature, in direct contact with earth, inside a big piece of non-deliberate landart. A personal research on “linescape” given expression to a series of postcards -a mapping series, a lines series, a personal intervention series and a trip series- that will travel by mail around the world, looking for being promoted, discovered and experienced as a reference of a unique landscape of The Netherlands.
The five series of my “linescape” postcard collection are shown next:
*Man-made line series



*Nature-made line series



*Trips series






*Personal intervention series



*Mapping series





(+) Impressed by the sunken lanes around Maastricht, my project is not about “landscape” but “linescape”.  I find it very artistic and sculpture-related. I have gone several times to Maastricht and surroundings to check personally these sunken lanes in the landscape but also other “man-made” lines that I consider very related to each other, such as the military fort of Maastricht or the former defensive wall of the city. I was taking pictures every 30 steps while I was making these promenades to express the feelings you have when you follow these lines, and how you are discovering the landscape on a sequence, sometimes you are higher, sometimes you are lower. In each line, I found something interesting in one point (invisible landmarks) because a line is made out of points: a small chapel, a water fountain… So, how can I highlight the landscape of Limburg and put it into value? What if this area is in a way a big artwork of Michael Heizer for instance? And what if in the end I make a point intervention on one point of one of these lines that embodies and reflects even more this sculpture character and the rest of the features, such as the feeling of been embraced by nature, direct contact with earth, partially vision of the landscape, etc.?







Here, some pages of the research booklet:



















Mentored by Rianne Makkink

LandLinescape | Invisible infrastructure of ideas | My 3rd Term Finals | 2011

Sunken lanes, hollow roads, military fortifications, highways, former defensive walls, harvesting lands… nature or man-made lines within the countryside of Maastricht where the landscape can be discovered on a sequence, sometimes you are higher, sometimes you are lower. A forgotten large-scale “linescape” with a strong sculptural character that makes you feel really embraced by nature, in direct contact with earth, inside a big piece of non-deliberate landart. A personal research on “linescape” given expression to a series of postcards -a mapping series, a lines series, a personal intervention series and a trip series- that will travel by mail around the world, looking for being promoted, discovered and experienced as a reference of a unique landscape of The Netherlands.

The five series of my “linescape” postcard collection are shown next:

*Man-made line series

*Nature-made line series

*Trips series

*Personal intervention series

*Mapping series


(+) Impressed by the sunken lanes around Maastricht, my project is not about “landscape” but “linescape”.  I find it very artistic and sculpture-related. I have gone several times to Maastricht and surroundings to check personally these sunken lanes in the landscape but also other “man-made” lines that I consider very related to each other, such as the military fort of Maastricht or the former defensive wall of the city. I was taking pictures every 30 steps while I was making these promenades to express the feelings you have when you follow these lines, and how you are discovering the landscape on a sequence, sometimes you are higher, sometimes you are lower. In each line, I found something interesting in one point (invisible landmarks) because a line is made out of points: a small chapel, a water fountain… So, how can I highlight the landscape of Limburg and put it into value? What if this area is in a way a big artwork of Michael Heizer for instance? And what if in the end I make a point intervention on one point of one of these lines that embodies and reflects even more this sculpture character and the rest of the features, such as the feeling of been embraced by nature, direct contact with earth, partially vision of the landscape, etc.?

Here, some pages of the research booklet:

Mentored by Rianne Makkink

About:

Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne's inspiration garden for design and architecture.

lannelenne.hola@gmail.com
(FR) 0033 695713947, (ES) 0034 667660806, (NL) 0031 685213430

Feel free to reach me by email or telephone. You can also "Ask me anything" or explore my main page on www.lanne-lenne.com as well.
All works under '#it's mine' © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved; do not use or reproduce without the expressed written consent from the author.